Crane flies galore...

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MarkAguglia
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Crane flies galore...

Post by MarkAguglia » Sat Sep 07, 2019 8:06 am

I put down Bayer Complete Insect Killer on June 1st which is the same thing I did last year and it controlled everything pest wise. I just applied some Milorganite this week and now my lawns infested by Crane flies. Should I do another insect app if I already did one in June? Or will they go away once the Milo is in the soil longer?

Thanks!

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Dawgvet
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Re: Crane flies galore...

Post by Dawgvet » Sun Sep 08, 2019 8:02 am

MarkAguglia wrote:
Sat Sep 07, 2019 8:06 am
Should I do another insect app if I already did one in June? Or will they go away once the Milo is in the soil longer?

Thanks!
Crane flies are pretty harmless. Adults don’t eat anything (mainly drink dew/nectar) so I don’t think it’s the Milo. Adults only live for a few days. Larvae are found in water not soil. Adding more insecticide to lawn will not “prevent” more from hatching.

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MarkAguglia
Posts: 544
Joined: Thu Jul 13, 2017 6:55 pm
Location: Cheektowaga, New York
Grass Type: Perrenial Rye, TTTF, KBG Mix
Lawn Size: 4250 sq ft.
Mower: Toro 26622 (1990), Toro 20334

Re: Crane flies galore...

Post by MarkAguglia » Tue Sep 10, 2019 5:31 pm

Dawgvet wrote:
Sun Sep 08, 2019 8:02 am
MarkAguglia wrote:
Sat Sep 07, 2019 8:06 am
Should I do another insect app if I already did one in June? Or will they go away once the Milo is in the soil longer?

Thanks!
Crane flies are pretty harmless. Adults don’t eat anything (mainly drink dew/nectar) so I don’t think it’s the Milo. Adults only live for a few days. Larvae are found in water not soil. Adding more insecticide to lawn will not “prevent” more from hatching.
Thanks!! Within a couple days they've now actually disappeared. They were everywhere!

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Dawgvet
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Re: Crane flies galore...

Post by Dawgvet » Tue Sep 10, 2019 6:09 pm

It was probably a 'hatch" . The larvae all hatch into adults within a short period of time to reproduce and then just die.
Trout fisherman look forward to such hatches with Damselflies, Mayflies, Caddis, etc. (not crane flies though)
Is there a water source nearby (stream/lake/golf course pond)?

Wjc129
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Re: Crane flies galore...

Post by Wjc129 » Wed Sep 11, 2019 2:14 pm

I have the same issue, in the past couple days they have been coming out of my lawn like crazy. I have heard the same thing that they basically come out, reproduce, lay eggs and then die. I have also heard that those eggs turn into larvae which through the winter into spring munch on the grass roots. I have encountered some lawn damage because of this myself. I have had issues with them the past 2-3 years. I cannot get rid of them. I have done fall and spring applications of Bayer Complete Insect Killer and in the spring this year did a Grubex app which also claims to control the larvae. Nothing I have done has worked. I need help as well. It is a couple week window where they are a nuisance and when you walk through the lawn they fly up at you.

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Dawgvet
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Re: Crane flies galore...

Post by Dawgvet » Wed Sep 11, 2019 4:54 pm

I will have to apologize for misinformation I gave earlier. After more research, I found that there are a couple species of crane fly that can have larva in moist ground environments (leaf litter)
Crane fly larvae are usually aquatic, living in streams and lakes, but also in moist places such as under leaf litter in ditches and sometimes underground.
Like mayflies, the winged adult crane flies usually do not eat, and spend their brief time mating and laying eggs. Females lay their eggs either under water or in soil near water. The larvae can take a few months or up to five years developing under water, depending on species. Then they pupate and later emerge as adults. Most crane flies have only one brood a year.
I also found there is an invasive European crane fly in the North East that I wasn't familiar with that can live in lawns.
HOW TO PREVENT & CONTROL CRANE FLIES

The European crane fly is an invasive lawn pest that is prevalent in the northwest as well as the northeast. While native species of crane flies live on decaying leaves, this species attacks pastures and lawns. The adults are harmless, but the larvae can damage your lawn. The larvae of the European crane fly are also known as leather jackets.

Overview
Control Crane Flies in the Lawn
When you see them, you think you're on the set of a B-movie - something like The Attack of the Giant Mosquitoes. After all, that's what European crane flies look like. The adults are harmless. It's the larvae that do all the damage. Sometimes called leather jackets, these larvae hatch in the fall and live on grass blades until they go underground for the winter. In the spring, they're back out on the lawn. They're very tough on that new grass you just planted.

Prevention and Maintenance
How to Tell if You Have European Crane Fly Larvae in Your Lawn
Your lawn's appearance gives them away. In the fall and spring, look for patches of damaged grass. These patches may grow together and spread. Where the infestation is heavy, you may see a brownish paste. Dig into your soil and look for brownish-grey larvae about 1 inch long. A few are no problem. If you see lots - say, 80 per square foot - you should control them.
You want to control European Crane Fly larvae when they're most active - usually in early to mid-April

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Dawgvet
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Re: Crane flies galore...

Post by Dawgvet » Wed Sep 11, 2019 5:02 pm

Wjc129 wrote:
Wed Sep 11, 2019 2:14 pm
I need help as well. It is a couple week window where they are a nuisance and when you walk through the lawn they fly up at you.
I found This article on control;
Edit: Link just keeps leading to main page of Turf website. Just do a search for crane flies on the main page and the article will show.
Here is the part about treatment:
Stahnke’s chemical trials of crane fly controls over the years have allowed her to devise three different treatments, one for different times of the year and different larval sizes. It is important, once the presence of crane flies is established, to get in the habit of monitoring them and determining which of the three control methods to use. If the last 45 years are any indication, this will continue to be a long-term problem.

The first control option takes place during the adults’ oviposition phase in the fall. In her location, Stahnke says this is about September 15. There are two interchangeable insecticides that have proven to give 75 percent control of larvae at this point: imidacloprid (Merit) and thiamethoxam (Meridian). These are “least-toxic” formulations that give good control at labeled rates and have a short residual period. Stahnke points out that this treatment will not work if they are used at one of the other time periods. A 75 percent control level works out pretty well, as she calculates that birds eat about 30 percent of the larvae in any case.

The second control window is around November 15, when the larvae of the ECF are at the second instar level. Dursban used to be Stahnke’s insecticide of choice here, but it is no longer registered for home and commercial lawns. At this point she recommends four insecticides. The first is bifenthrin (Talstar in formulations FL, PL and EZ; as well as Onyx and One), and the second, although it may go off the market in the future, is carbaryl (Sevin SL). At this time of the year those two chemicals have been shown to give control in the 85 percent range in her tests. The last two formulations, a mix of clothianidin and bifenthrin (Aloft), and clothianidin by itself (Arena), provided 95 percent control and 75 percent control, respectively.

The third control period is from February to mid-March, when the ECF is in its fourth instar and the CCF is in its third instar. Again carbaryl (Sevin SL) will achieve 60 percent control even at a low application rate, which is generally adequate with birds feeding on the larvae. Another chemical effective at this time is bifenthrin (Talstar), which has given her almost a 90 percent control rate in her trials. A third is indoxacarb (Provaunt), and a fourth is chlorantraniliprole (Acelepryn). The last two are new products that both provided about 95 percent control.
Last edited by Dawgvet on Thu Sep 12, 2019 10:04 am, edited 1 time in total.

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