Herbicide Guide

Cool season grasses like Kentucky Bluegrass, Fescue & Rye
User avatar
Suburban Jungle Life
Posts: 1616
Joined: Thu Mar 01, 2018 3:34 pm
Location: MD/DMV
Grass Type: TTTF & Zoysia
Lawn Size: 18M
Mower: Spinning Machete
Contact:

Herbicide Guide

Post by Suburban Jungle Life » Thu Sep 27, 2018 11:51 am

This guide is to assist with herbicide choices and to help ease the long list of options. This is a breakdown of commonly used herbicides. Reference this list for a more complete chart. Use the companies in the quick links at the top of the page to purchase these herbicides. Plants have shown resistance to herbicides and this is becoming an increasing problem. Always apply herbicides using label rates. Lower rates may increase herbicide resistance. When optimal to do so, mix multiple groups so the plant is attacked in different ways making it much harder to build up any resistance. Always wear protective clothing per the product label. (Products listed in parenthesis are brand names. Look for generics to save $$.)

Popular Herbicides
Group: 1
Clethodim (GrassOut Max, Arrest Max)
Kills all grasses but not flowers and shrubs. Great when you accidentally "over" seed into mulch or flower beds.
Fenoxaprop (Acclaim Extra)
Mainly to control crabgrass, stiltgrass, and goosegrass.
Fluazifop (Fusilade II, Ornamec)
Stunts bermuda but helps to control crabgrass and goosegrass.
Sethoxydim
Kills all grasses but not flowers and shrubs. Great when you accidentally "over" seed into mulch or flower beds.
Group: 2
Florasulam (Defendor)
Targets broadleaf weeds. Works well in cooler temps.
Halosulfuron (Sedgehammer, Sedgemaster, ProSedge)
Mainly to targets sedges but also many broadleaf weeds.
Imazapyr (Polaris, TVC)
Pre and post-emergent. Non-selective. Kills almost everything. Lasts in the soil up to 1 year.
Metsulfuron (MSM Turf, Manor)
Targets many broadleaf weeds.
Group: 3
Dithiopyr (Dimension)
Pre-emergent and Post-emergent. Has some post emergent activity on crab grass. Doesn't have a long lasting effect.
Pendimethalin (Pendulum)
Pre-emergent.
Prodiamine (Barricade, Resolute)
Pre-emergent. Lasts 3-8 months depending on application rate. Cheap. Apply in fall for winter weeds and apply in spring for summer weeds.
Group: 4
2,4-D, Dicamba, MCPA, MCPP-Mecoprop (Typical 3-way herbicide)
Post-emergent to target most broadleaf weeds. Main product for weed control. Dicamba shouldn't be used on tree roots.
Quinclorac (Drive)
Mainly to target crabgrass. Can be applied around seeding depending on type of grass seeded.
Triclopyr
Mainly for broadleaf weeds but works well on tougher plants like ivy. May stunt bermuda.
Group: 5
Amicarbazone (Xonerate)
Mainly for poa annua control. Also labelled for poa trivialis control. Big $$.
Group: 8
Bensulide (Bensumec)
Pre-emergent. Consider using this if you reach prodiamine and dithiopyr annual limits.
Ethofumesate (Poa Constrictor, Prograss, Rightline ETHO 4 SC)
Mainly to target poa annua. 2 apps in the fall and 1 in the spring (best as pre-emergent).
Group: 9
Glyphosate (Roundup)
Non-selective post-emergent. Kills all green plants. Bermuda will take multiple applications.
Group: 10
Glufosinate (Finale)
Non-selective post-emergent. Kills all plants but does not translocate systemically.
Group: 14
Carfentrazone (QuickSilver)
Works on many broadleaf weeds but mainly added to other herbicides to hasten their effects.
Pyraflufen-ethyl (Octane)
Works on many broadleaf weeds but mainly added to other herbicides to hasten their effects.
Sulfentrazone (Dismiss)
Mainly to target sedges but also works on many broadleaf weeds.
Group: 21
Isoxaben (Gallery)
Pre-emergent. Targets most broadleaf weeds. Not labelled to control crabgrass, goosegrass, and poa annua.
Group: 22
Diquat (Reward)
Non-selective post-emergent. Kills leaf tissue within 2-3 days but does not translocate systemically. Works well in cool weather. Add to glyphosate to speed up burndown.
Group: 27
Mesotrione (Tenacity)
Pre-emergent, mainly to target weeds during seeding. Also targets poa annua as a pre-emergent.
Post-emergent to target mainly bentgrass and nimblewill but has some activity on poa annua and bermuda.
Topramezone (Pylex)
Post-emergent to control bermuda and zoysia. Big $$$ but cost per 1000 sq ft is low.

Adjuvants:

Most herbicide's efficacy can be increased with the addition of surfactants, nitrogen, and ph adjustments. Always read the herbicide label as some specify which ones to use and which ones to avoid.
Surfactants:
NIS: non-ionic surfactant
COC: crop oil concentrate
MSO: methylated seed oil
Organosilicone
Other additions:
AMS: ammonium sulfate (nitrogen & lower PH)
citric acid: lower PH

Popular Combinations

3 way herbicide: Controls most broadleaf weeds.
2,4-D, Dicamba, MCPP or MCPA (usually already sold together but adding NIS and AMS can be helpful)
Soul Stealer: Kills bermuda and zoysia grass for a renovation. Kills all other weeds and grasses too...
Triclopyr, Fluazifop, Glyphosate, (Topramezone if you have it), AMS, NIS. This has a 3 week reseed interval. Drop the Triclopyr and Fluazifop and Topramezone closer to seeding. Consider applying 2 apps of sethoxydim or clethodim prior to Soul Stealer.

Products available at home improvement stores
It is best to buy concentrates since the costs are much lower per application from the companies in the quick links at the top of the page but if you have a really small yard or need something today...

Bayer Season Long Weed Control
3 way herbicide for most broadleaf weeds with a pre-emergent
2,4-D & MCPP & Dicamba & Isoxaben
Roundup for Lawns: (NOT glyphosate!!! Double check label)
Kills most broadleaf weeds including crabgrass and sedges.
MCPA & Dicamba & Quinclorac & Sulfentrazone
Spectracide Weed Stop for Lawns
3 way herbicide for most broadleaf weeds, same as WBG
2,4-D & Dicamba & MCPP
WBG: Weed B Gon
3 way herbicide for most broadleaf weeds
2,4-D & Dicamba & MCPP
WBG CCO: Weed B Gone Chickweed, Clover and Oxalis
Management of tough broadleaf weeds
Triclopyr
WBG crabgrass: Weed B Gon crabgrass
Standard WBG with kicker to include management of crabgrass
2,4-D & Dicamba & Quinclorac
Last edited by Suburban Jungle Life on Tue Oct 22, 2019 9:50 am, edited 22 times in total.

User avatar
Suburban Jungle Life
Posts: 1616
Joined: Thu Mar 01, 2018 3:34 pm
Location: MD/DMV
Grass Type: TTTF & Zoysia
Lawn Size: 18M
Mower: Spinning Machete
Contact:

Re: Herbicide Guide

Post by Suburban Jungle Life » Thu Sep 27, 2018 11:52 am

This is what I keep on hand and will take care of most problems:
1: Prodiamine
2: 3 way herbicide mix
3: Triclopyr
4: Sulfentrazone (Dismiss) or Halosulfuron (Sedgehammer)
5: Mesotrione (Tenacity)
6: Glyphosate

I use Prodiamine and this takes care of most of the problems. You will have very few weeds and may need to spot spray them or hand pull the few stragglers. I use a split application in early spring. If you aren't seeding in the fall, use it then as well. Prodiamine is a game changer!

I spot spray weeds on occasion. I typically use a 3 way herbicide mix (2,4-D & MCPP or MCPA & dicamba (Already comes mixed in a bottle)). Sometimes I like to add triclopyr to the 3 way to help with some of the tougher weeds like ivy and clover. I also add adjuvents such as AMS and NIS to boost efficacy.

Unless you have a large property, try to buy small quantities or split with someone else to save money. Most of the ones I use are pretty inexpensive.
Last edited by Suburban Jungle Life on Thu Oct 10, 2019 10:39 am, edited 2 times in total.

User avatar
Suburban Jungle Life
Posts: 1616
Joined: Thu Mar 01, 2018 3:34 pm
Location: MD/DMV
Grass Type: TTTF & Zoysia
Lawn Size: 18M
Mower: Spinning Machete
Contact:

Re: Herbicide Guide

Post by Suburban Jungle Life » Thu Sep 27, 2018 11:52 am

First, use the weed ID thread to confirm what you have if you aren't sure.

Common Problems and their controls:

Broadleaf weeds
Basically, all weeds with irregular shaped leaves which don't look like grass.
(Dandelions, clover, creeping charlie, wild violet, etc. )

Use a 3 way herbicide with AMS and NIS and add Triclopyr if you want. Or, spray the 3 way and wait a few weeks then spray Triclopyr if you still have some stubborn ones. Use Triclopyr for creeping charlie, wild violet, and clover. Make sure to apply Prodiamine or another pre-emergent in the early spring and early fall to stop most broadleaf weeds (except if you are seeding).

Moss
Carfentrazone. Soapy water. Heavy doses of iron. ZeroTol 2.0. Rake it out. Moss will come right back if you don't change it's optimal growing conditions. Soil test, correct PH, seed for a thick lawn, and keep fertilized. Reduce shade by trimming trees. Remove causes for damp conditions. If shade is from a house, remove the house for a beautiful lawn or consider a flower bed instead.

Grassy Weeds
Weeds which look more like grass with thinner and more uniform blades

Barnyard grass: Quinclorac. Mesotrione. Topramezone.

Bentgrass: Mesotrione as a post-emergent with NIS.

Bermuda (wiregrass): Topramezone and Triclopyr. For a renovation, use "soul stealer" in the OP. Most of the other options haven't shown great results. Hand pulling isn't reliable. The smallest piece of a stem will start a new plant and come right back. Be aware when using a core aerator as it can spread the bermuda everywhere.

Crabgrass: Quinclorac. It dies every winter at first frost so it is best to use Prodiamine in the spring when ground temps get into the early 50's. About the same time as the forsythia bloom. Crabgrass won't exist anymore with a pre-emergent so there isn't a need to buy anything else to control it.

Dallisgrass: Glyphosate. Topramezone with Triclopyr. In fescue, try 2 apps of Fluazifop or 2 apps of Fluazifop & Mesotrione (so-so control). Make sure to use Prodiamine in the spring to stop new plants.

Foxtail: Mesotrione as a post-emergent. Topramezone. Quinclorac.

Goosegrass: Mesotrione as a post-emergent. Fenoxaprop. Fluazifop. Topramezone. It is best to use Prodiamine in the spring to prevent it. Goosegrass germinates when soil temps get into the 60's.

Nimblewill: Mesotrione as a post-emergent. Topramezone. Glyphosate.

Nutsedge: Halosulfuron if you have a little (comes in a small packet. Cheap). Sulfentrazone if you have a lot. Mesotrione as a post-emergent. Don't hand pull it. The small nutlets underground break off and it grows back and multiplies.

Orchardgrass: Glyphosate. Hand pull it.

Poa annua (annual bluegrass): This is best done on a pre-emergent basis. Apply 2 rounds of Mesotrione and Ethofumesate in the fall for fescue and rye. Read labels and time around seeding. After the 2 months of coverage these give, apply prodiamine for the rest of winter. Apply prodiamine to cover any spring growth. This should be done for many years as the seed bank can be large. For bluegrass, apply prodiamine late summer and early spring. Don't overseed. Use nitrogen to help grass spread. Another option for control is Amicarbazone.

Poa trivialis (roughstalk bluegrass): Glyphosate in spring time. You can use Mesotrione as a post-emergent to turn it white and make it easier to see but it won't kill it. May not have complete kill at other times of the year. Another option is Amicarbazone.

Quackgrass: Glyphosate. Fluazifop. May take multiple sprays.

Star of Bethlehem: Sulfentrazone. Some may survive until next year so treat as needed.

Stiltgrass: Topramezone. Glyphosate. Fluazifop. May take multiple sprays.

Wild Onion & Garlic: Most herbicides are labelled to take care of these. The reason these plants are hard to control is the narrow leaves and waxy coating. This makes it hard for herbicides to stick to them. The bulbs underground also gives them plenty of reserves to make it through an herbicide app. Be sure to spot spray them as you see them pop up during the year and use a surfactant. Full control may take a couple years. If you wish to hand pull them, use a shovel and be sure to get all the bulbs or it will come right back. Bulbs may be as deep as 6".

Zoysia: Topramezone and Triclopyr. For a renovation, use "soul stealer" in the OP. Hand pulling isn't reliable. The smallest piece of a stem will start a new plant and come right back. Be aware when using a core aerator as it can spread the zoysia everywhere.
Last edited by Suburban Jungle Life on Wed Aug 28, 2019 8:28 am, edited 20 times in total.

rockinmylawn
Posts: 176
Joined: Sun Mar 25, 2018 1:02 pm
Location: CVA
Grass Type: TTTF
Lawn Size: 6.5K
Mower: Craftsman V60 Cordless SP

Re: Herbicide Guide

Post by rockinmylawn » Thu Sep 27, 2018 12:02 pm

Any guidance for Herbicides around trees - as close as the tree's branch reach not root zone - as I have 20 evergreen Green Giants & their leaves don't reach as far vs. say a leaf dropping tree.

But not knowing how far their root zones are underneath the ground, I have laid down WBG or Speedzone with Dicamba within 2-3 ft of the leaf zones in the past that I fear it might have some damaging effect.

User avatar
pennstater2005
Moderator
Posts: 4862
Joined: Mon Jul 17, 2017 6:16 am
Location: Western PA
Grass Type: Northern Mix
Lawn Size: 15,000 sq ft
Mower: Husqvarna YTH18K46

Re: Herbicide Guide

Post by pennstater2005 » Thu Sep 27, 2018 12:07 pm

Excellent write up! What you have on hand @Suburban Jungle Life is nearly identical to what I have.
"Perfection, like infinity, is unobtainable, even at places like Augusta. It's the journey toward the goal that holds all the fun, joy, and reward." - dfw_pilot

Lawn Fertilizer Calculator

Credit

User avatar
Suburban Jungle Life
Posts: 1616
Joined: Thu Mar 01, 2018 3:34 pm
Location: MD/DMV
Grass Type: TTTF & Zoysia
Lawn Size: 18M
Mower: Spinning Machete
Contact:

Re: Herbicide Guide

Post by Suburban Jungle Life » Thu Sep 27, 2018 12:10 pm

rockinmylawn wrote:
Thu Sep 27, 2018 12:02 pm
Any guidance for Herbicides around trees - as close as the tree's branch reach not root zone - as I have 20 evergreen Green Giants & their leaves don't reach as far vs. say a leaf dropping tree.

But not knowing how far their root zones are underneath the ground, I have laid down WBG or Speedzone with Dicamba within 2-3 ft of the leaf zones in the past that I fear it might have some damaging effect.
The biggest problem is when you accidentally spray the tree leaves. The next would be if the tree root or bark is injured and then the tree can easily absorb any herbicide. For example, you accidentally mow the root or hit a root/bark with a string trimmer and then spray herbicide.

Dicamba is specified on the label to keep away from the root zone. Many tree's roots extend up to 2 times the reach of the leaves. Best to keep it that far away and only spray on days with no wind and avoid times when inversion may occur. Choose a different herbicide instead.

User avatar
Suburban Jungle Life
Posts: 1616
Joined: Thu Mar 01, 2018 3:34 pm
Location: MD/DMV
Grass Type: TTTF & Zoysia
Lawn Size: 18M
Mower: Spinning Machete
Contact:

Re: Herbicide Guide

Post by Suburban Jungle Life » Thu Sep 27, 2018 12:13 pm

pennstater2005 wrote:
Thu Sep 27, 2018 12:07 pm
Excellent write up! What you have on hand @Suburban Jungle Life is nearly identical to what I have.
Thanks! I couldn't find a quick reference so I figured I'd write one up. There are probably 200 herbicides but I tried to pick the most popular ones. I'll keep adding if others have recommendations.

User avatar
Harts
TLF Supporter
Posts: 1312
Joined: Mon May 14, 2018 6:50 am
Location: Mississauga, Ontario, Canada
Grass Type: KBG / PRG
Lawn Size: 2,500
Mower: Toro GM1000

Re: Herbicide Guide

Post by Harts » Thu Sep 27, 2018 12:20 pm

Excellent guide. Do you think it would be beneficial to add typical brand names, for example Weed B Gon CCO (Triclopyr) or Ortho Killex (2, 4-D, Dicamba, MCPP)? Might help someone who is completely new and unsure of what product to buy. You have already done a few (glyphosate, mesotrione etc.).

I also realize this is more work on your end!

User avatar
Suburban Jungle Life
Posts: 1616
Joined: Thu Mar 01, 2018 3:34 pm
Location: MD/DMV
Grass Type: TTTF & Zoysia
Lawn Size: 18M
Mower: Spinning Machete
Contact:

Re: Herbicide Guide

Post by Suburban Jungle Life » Thu Sep 27, 2018 12:35 pm

Harts wrote:
Thu Sep 27, 2018 12:20 pm
Excellent guide. Do you think it would be beneficial to add typical brand names, for example Weed B Gon CCO (Triclopyr) or Ortho Killex (2, 4-D, Dicamba, MCPP)? Might help someone who is completely new and unsure of what product to buy. You have already done a few (glyphosate, mesotrione etc.).

I also realize this is more work on your end!
I thought about that but there are a million combinations and just soo many products. I feel it would take weeks to complete. Would it be beneficial to list just a few commonly used ones?

PA Lawn Guy
Posts: 50
Joined: Sun Jul 01, 2018 8:23 pm
Location: Philadelphia suburbs
Grass Type: TTTF/PRG/KBG
Lawn Size: half acre
Mower: Lawn tractor and Honda HRR

Re: Herbicide Guide

Post by PA Lawn Guy » Thu Sep 27, 2018 1:58 pm

Do you recall the effective ingredient in Preen? Is it a Group 3?

Edit: trifluralin

This list is an awesome resource, thank you for putting it together!
Last edited by PA Lawn Guy on Thu Sep 27, 2018 2:00 pm, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
Harts
TLF Supporter
Posts: 1312
Joined: Mon May 14, 2018 6:50 am
Location: Mississauga, Ontario, Canada
Grass Type: KBG / PRG
Lawn Size: 2,500
Mower: Toro GM1000

Re: Herbicide Guide

Post by Harts » Thu Sep 27, 2018 2:02 pm

You make a good point. I think just the common ones (the bare necessities).

I think I'm looking at this from the perspective of someone who comes to this board for the first time who doesn't have a clue (I mean that respectively, of course). Someone who wants a level 1 or wants to get to level 2.

Group: 3
Dithiopyr (Dimension)
Pre-emergent and Post-emergent. Has some post emergent activity on crab grass. Doesn't have a long lasting effect.
Prodiamine (Barricade)
Pre-emergent. Lasts 3-8 months depending on application rate. Cheap. Apply in fall for winter weeds and apply in spring for summer weeds.

Group: 4
2,4-D, Dicamba, MCPA, MCPP (Mecoprop) (Weed B Gon)
Mainly to target most broadleaf weeds. Dicamba shouldn't be used on tree roots.
Triclopyr (Weed B Gon CCO)
Mainly for broadleaf weeds but works well on tougher plants like ivy. Has some activity on bermuda.

User avatar
pennstater2005
Moderator
Posts: 4862
Joined: Mon Jul 17, 2017 6:16 am
Location: Western PA
Grass Type: Northern Mix
Lawn Size: 15,000 sq ft
Mower: Husqvarna YTH18K46

Re: Herbicide Guide

Post by pennstater2005 » Thu Sep 27, 2018 2:15 pm

If you’re just starting out herbicides can be daunting. This will be a nice resource to direct people. I always recommend Weed B Gon as a starting point. If folks go down the rabbit hole deep enough they’ll figure out they can buy in concentrate off brand for cheaper. It’s just easier to say go to Lowe’s..........
"Perfection, like infinity, is unobtainable, even at places like Augusta. It's the journey toward the goal that holds all the fun, joy, and reward." - dfw_pilot

Lawn Fertilizer Calculator

Credit

User avatar
Suburban Jungle Life
Posts: 1616
Joined: Thu Mar 01, 2018 3:34 pm
Location: MD/DMV
Grass Type: TTTF & Zoysia
Lawn Size: 18M
Mower: Spinning Machete
Contact:

Re: Herbicide Guide

Post by Suburban Jungle Life » Thu Sep 27, 2018 2:16 pm

Harts wrote:
Thu Sep 27, 2018 2:02 pm
You make a good point. I think just the common ones (the bare necessities).

I think I'm looking at this from the perspective of someone who comes to this board for the first time who doesn't have a clue (I mean that respectively, of course). Someone who wants a level 1 or wants to get to level 2.
I think I'll add a list at the bottom with common products from a home improvement store. As for prodiamine, I'm thinking most people would buy the generic not barricade. I listed a few of the others since many have talked about them interchangeably such as glyphosate and roundup.

User avatar
pennstater2005
Moderator
Posts: 4862
Joined: Mon Jul 17, 2017 6:16 am
Location: Western PA
Grass Type: Northern Mix
Lawn Size: 15,000 sq ft
Mower: Husqvarna YTH18K46

Re: Herbicide Guide

Post by pennstater2005 » Thu Sep 27, 2018 2:19 pm

To be clear you are writing this only as a cool season herbicide guide, correct? If so this could be attached to @g-man’s lawn guide to make it easier to find.
"Perfection, like infinity, is unobtainable, even at places like Augusta. It's the journey toward the goal that holds all the fun, joy, and reward." - dfw_pilot

Lawn Fertilizer Calculator

Credit

User avatar
Suburban Jungle Life
Posts: 1616
Joined: Thu Mar 01, 2018 3:34 pm
Location: MD/DMV
Grass Type: TTTF & Zoysia
Lawn Size: 18M
Mower: Spinning Machete
Contact:

Re: Herbicide Guide

Post by Suburban Jungle Life » Thu Sep 27, 2018 2:19 pm

pennstater2005 wrote:
Thu Sep 27, 2018 2:15 pm
If you’re just starting out herbicides can be daunting. This will be a nice resource to direct people. I always recommend Weed B Gon as a starting point. If folks go down the rabbit hole deep enough they’ll figure out they can buy in concentrate off brand for cheaper. It’s just easier to say go to Lowe’s..........
This was my idea. I wasn't going to list every herbicide and everything each one controls. Just the main points so someone starting with herbicides can see what they might need. I'll add a list of home store products.

User avatar
Suburban Jungle Life
Posts: 1616
Joined: Thu Mar 01, 2018 3:34 pm
Location: MD/DMV
Grass Type: TTTF & Zoysia
Lawn Size: 18M
Mower: Spinning Machete
Contact:

Re: Herbicide Guide

Post by Suburban Jungle Life » Thu Sep 27, 2018 2:23 pm

pennstater2005 wrote:
Thu Sep 27, 2018 2:19 pm
To be clear you are writing this only as a cool season herbicide guide, correct? If so this could be attached to @g-man’s lawn guide to make it easier to find.
Definitely cool season! Half of that stuff I listed I wouldn't use on warm season grass. They mostly use celsius, certainty, and msm at higher rates. This in contrast to the fungicide guide I wrote which is more general but still slightly more focused on cool season. Especially in the comments section but the OP being a good reference for everyone.

User avatar
Harts
TLF Supporter
Posts: 1312
Joined: Mon May 14, 2018 6:50 am
Location: Mississauga, Ontario, Canada
Grass Type: KBG / PRG
Lawn Size: 2,500
Mower: Toro GM1000

Re: Herbicide Guide

Post by Harts » Thu Sep 27, 2018 2:37 pm

Sounds great! I really appreciate the time and effort you are putting into this and your other threads.

User avatar
Suburban Jungle Life
Posts: 1616
Joined: Thu Mar 01, 2018 3:34 pm
Location: MD/DMV
Grass Type: TTTF & Zoysia
Lawn Size: 18M
Mower: Spinning Machete
Contact:

Re: Herbicide Guide

Post by Suburban Jungle Life » Thu Sep 27, 2018 3:16 pm

@Harts Thanks! :thumbsup:

User avatar
g-man
Moderator
Posts: 8456
Joined: Wed Jun 14, 2017 10:32 pm
Location: Fishers, IN
Grass Type: Front: Northern Mix Back: Bewi
Lawn Size: 5678
Mower: John Deere 220E

Re: Herbicide Guide

Post by g-man » Thu Sep 27, 2018 3:32 pm

I will added it tonight when I get to a PC instead of a cell.

User avatar
g-man
Moderator
Posts: 8456
Joined: Wed Jun 14, 2017 10:32 pm
Location: Fishers, IN
Grass Type: Front: Northern Mix Back: Bewi
Lawn Size: 5678
Mower: John Deere 220E

Re: Herbicide Guide

Post by g-man » Thu Sep 27, 2018 5:09 pm

I think there is one herbicide that we should add, pylex. It is very expensive right now, but once generic, it should be a game changer like tenacity was.

Post Reply